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29 Oct

BORN FOR INSTAGRAM

A model walks the runway at the Moschino show at Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2019/20 on February 20, 2019 in Milan, Italy (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)

“I want my clothes to have a life and then end up in a second hand store, some cool girl discovers them 20 years later. If the runway or red carpet is the only life clothes have, it’s sad” – says Jeremy Scott, one of the most eccentric designers of the last two centuries. He doesn’t make his clothes for the critic.

“ I think fashion takes itself way too seriously. It should be frivolous and fun.  You are not meant to see it as church and pray to a blouse”. He speaks the language of pop culture in fashion. His designs look as if they were created for Instagram – colourful, accentuated, and it speaks for itself. “The pop energy of an image, which is smaller than the palm of my hand, excites me greatly”, says the designer regarding his favourite social media platform.

Jeremy has always overflowed with eccentricity. From his early childhood, which he spent on a farm in Kansas City, he felt like an outsider. He is convinced, however, that “being an outsider doesn’t mean you’re lonely”. In the polaroid photos from the 1990s, we see him with high heels, a strange hair style and inexplicable clothes.

“I started from nothing. A nothing that you couldn’t make anything out of”, he shares. This “nothing” is where his genius ideas are born. A soft feather inspires him to create the limited-edition winged sneakers by Adidas.

The idea for flame-adorned Ugg boots is also a product of his imagination. “The inspiration for the decoration came from the Hot-Rod cars, a symbol of the 1950s and a distinctive part of the history of Los Angeles. He experiments with Longchamp and Swatch.

For him fashion isn’t sacred, but must bring positive emotions with it. He enjoys intertwining humоr and design, which is why he uses popular figures such as Mickey Mouse, who speaks “a universal language” all over the world. The same goes for Barbie, the Looney Tunes characters, SpongeBob SquarePants, Jesus Christ, the Simpsons…

Today Jeremy Scott works for Moschino. It’s as if only he can blend the McDonald’s arched yellow M logo into a fashion motif, or use Barbie as a muse. It sounds fun but he looks at himself like “a farmer, harvesting his wares and taking them to the market, and then go back and do it again”. His satirical approach, in life and fashion, has become his trademark and will probably never fail him.

Stella Maxwell and Jeremy Scott depart The 2019 Met Gala Celebrating Camp: Notes on Fashion at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 06, 2019 in New York City (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)

“I want my clothes to have a life and then end up in a second hand store, some cool girl discovers them 20 years later. If the runway or red carpet is the only life clothes have, it’s sad” – says Jeremy Scott, one of the most eccentric designers of the last two centuries. He doesn’t make his clothes for the critic.

“ I think fashion takes itself way too seriously. It should be frivolous and fun. You are not meant to see it as church and pray to a blouse”. He speaks the language of pop culture in fashion. His designs look as if they were created for Instagram – colourful, accentuated, and it speaks for itself. “The pop energy of an image, which is smaller than the palm of my hand, excites me greatly”, says the designer regarding his favourite social media platform.

Jeremy has always overflowed with eccentricity. From his early childhood, which he spent on a farm in Kansas City, he felt like an outsider. He is convinced, however, that “being an outsider doesn’t mean you’re lonely”. In the polaroid photos from the 1990s, we see him with high heels, a strange hair style and inexplicable clothes.

“I started from nothing. A nothing that you couldn’t make anything out of”, he shares. This “nothing” is where his genius ideas are born. A soft feather inspires him to create the limited-edition winged sneakers by Adidas.

Jeremy Scott poses at the adidas showroom during adidas Originals and Jeremy Scott new Fall/Winter 2012 collection presentation as part of Paris Fashionweek on March 1, 2012 in Paris, France (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)
A model poses backstage for the Jeremy Scott fashion show during New York Fashion Week: The Shows at Gallery I at Spring Studios on February 8, 2019 in New York City (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)
A model poses backstage for the Jeremy Scott fashion show during New York Fashion Week: The Shows at Gallery I at Spring Studios on February 8, 2019 in New York City (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)

The idea for flame-adorned Ugg boots is also a product of his imagination. “The inspiration for the decoration came from the Hot-Rod cars, a symbol of the 1950s and a distinctive part of the history of Los Angeles. He experiments with Longchamp and Swatch.

For him fashion isn’t sacred, but must bring positive emotions with it. He enjoys intertwining humоr and design, which is why he uses popular figures such as Mickey Mouse, who speaks “a universal language” all over the world. The same goes for Barbie, the Looney Tunes characters, SpongeBob SquarePants, Jesus Christ, the Simpsons…

Today Jeremy Scott works for Moschino. It’s as if only he can blend the McDonald’s arched yellow M logo into a fashion motif, or use Barbie as a muse. It sounds fun but he looks at himself like “a farmer, harvesting his wares and taking them to the market, and then go back and do it again”. His satirical approach, in life and fashion, has become his trademark and will probably never fail him.

Models walk the runway at the Jeremy Scott Autumn Winter 2017 fashion show during New York Fashion Week on February 10, 2017 in New York, United States (Guliver Photos/ Getty Images)